Safari Secrets: how to reload a stubborn web page


Sometimes a web page doesn’t load properly. In that case, you need to “reload” it. In Safari on the Mac, you can reload a web page by clicking the reload button (the curvy arrow in the address bar), as shown below.

Safari reload button
Safari reload button

But did you know…

1. If you click and hold the reload button, you get a menu with choices, as shown below…

Safari's Reload menu
Safari’s Reload menu

The options might come in handy for when a page just won’t load properly. Some need to be allowed to pop up a window. Some require plug-ins, like Adobe’s Flash. If a regular reload doesn’t give you the results you want, try the other two options in the menu.

2. You can do it from the from the View menu or via the keyboard shortcut Command-R.

Safari View menu
Safari View menu

3. You can hold the Option key down while you do Command-R (or, while you click the reload button) to force Safari to reload the page by going back to the server rather than just re-rendering what it already downloaded.

Safari Reload Page from Origin
Safari Reload Page from Origin

4. You can choose to reload the page while over-riding content blockers, or while using plug-ins from the View menu (same as the pop-up menu you get when clicking and holding on the Reload button in the address bar).

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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Two Shortcuts for Photos in Mojave

The Photos app in macOS 10.14 (Mojave) changes the keyboard shortcut for toggling between a zoomed-in view and the thumbnails. It used to be Spacebar— tap spacebar to pop open a selected thumbnail, tap it again to go back to the thumbnails. Spacebar doesn’t do it anymore. Now you use the Return key.

In practice you’re likely to double-click a thumbnail to open it. That’s the easiest.

Mojave Photos thumbnail view
Mojave Photos thumbnail view

You can “return” to the thumbnails three ways:
Three ways to return to Thumbnail view
Three ways to return to Thumbnail view

1. Double-click again
2. Click the “back” button at top left
3. Hit the Return key

If you’re used to using the Spacebar it will take some re-training before the Return key feels natural. I think it’s a good change though: when you’re in Edit mode, one tap of Return clicks the “Done” button, and the next tap of Return “returns” you to the thumbnails. Sort of makes sense.

Mojave Photos Edit mode
Mojave Photos Edit mode

Bonus: Command-Return (⌘-↩) takes you from Edit mode back to Thumbnail mode without requiring the second tap of Return. Similarly, if you’re in Thumbnail mode, and you have a picture selected, Command-Return takes you straight to Edit mode, saving a click.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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Activate 1Password from the Keyboard

1Password is the best password manager for the Mac. (It synchronizes with the iPhone and iPad too, so your passwords are always up to date.) Most people access their passwords by clicking the 1Password button on the toolbar in Safari, Firefox, or Chrome, but that’s the slow way to go.

The fast way: Command-\.

Command-\
Command-\

This pops open the 1Password “Unlock” box if 1Password is locked, and after you enter your master password and hit Return, 1Password automatically pops in the username and password you need for the website you’re on.
1Password Unlock dialog box
1Password Unlock dialog box

If 1Password is already unlocked, Command-\ fills in the username and password without you doing anything more.

Try it once and you’ll be hooked.

Not using 1Password yet? Read this article for more information.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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How to show the Emoji and Symbols Palette

You want to type things like this…

Smiley Emoji
Smiley Emoji

… but you don’t know how to do it. Until now!

Since Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks) there’s been an Emoji & Symbols menu item at the bottom of the Edit menu in many Mac programs. Choose that and you get this:

Emoji & Symbols palette
Emoji & Symbols palette

Choose a category on the left, and then choose a symbol/picture on the right. Double-click the picture to insert it into your document (Mail, Pages document, Messages).

BONUS: keyboard shortcut is Control-Command-Spacebar.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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Delete Conversations in Messages from the Keyboard

You may have tried pressing Delete or Backspace or even the forward delete key to delete a conversation in Messages. If you’ve tried, you know they don’t work. What does work is to hold the Command key down while pressing Delete or Backspace (forward delete won’t work).

If you select a conversation (see below) and then press Command-Delete (or Backspace– depends on what your keyboard calls it) you’ll get a message asking whether you’re sure you want to delete the conversation.

Dialog box in Messages on a Mac, asking whether one wants to delete a conversation
Are you sure you want to delete this conversation?

BONUS: skip the confirmation dialog box by adding the Option key to the mix. Command-Option-Delete (or Backspace) deletes the conversation without asking whether you’re sure. So be sure!

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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How to delete a file without having to empty the trash

— How to delete a file without having to empty the trash —

You know that things you put into the trash aren’t really gone until you empty the trash, right? Turns out that in 10.11.x (El Capitan) you can throw something way and have it be deleted immediately if you want. Just click on the item you want to delete, then go to File/Move to Trash… except hold the Option key down while you do it, and you’ll see “Delete Immediately…”

Delete Immediately with the Option Key
Delete Immediately with the Option Key

You’ll still have to deal with a dialog box:
Are you sure you want to delete immediately?
Are you sure you want to delete immediately?

Keyboard Junkies: you know that Command-Delete (or Command-Backspace) sends the selected item to the Trash. So, if you hold the Option key while you do it (Command-Option-Delete) the items will be “Immediately Deleted.” Very fast– but then you have to deal with the “Are you sure” dialog box. Bonus Hint: use Command-D to click the “Delete” button in that box from the keyboard. Command-Option-Delete, then Command-D, takes care of everything.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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Easy way to remember four important keyboard shortcuts

Undo Cut Copy Paste

One could argue that Undo, Cut, Copy, and Paste are the menu items that make a Mac a Mac. They are always in the Edit menu, and every program uses the same keyboard shortcuts for them:

  • ⌘-Z for Undo
  • ⌘-X for Cut
  • ⌘-C for Copy
  • ⌘-V for Paste

Guess what? The keys are right next to each other, in the bottom row of the keyboard. That should make remembering them easier.

I don’t know how they came up with the Z for Undo, but that’s OK. I do have some ideas for X, C, and V but only if you ask.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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Move items to the Trash, from the keyboard

Apple-Keyboard-Command-Key Apple-Keyboard-Delete-Key

If you click on an icon in the Finder, and then press ⌘-Delete, the item will fly into the Trash. It’s still retrievable, same as anything else you put into the Trash. It just gets there a really easy way.

Clicking on an icon and then pressing the Delete key by itself does nothing. You have to add the Command key.

If you look in the Finder’s File menu you’ll see the shortcut.

Finder File menu

UPDATE: I wrote about this in April 2015. Oopsy. I’ll make up for it.

Want some more, longer how-tos?

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